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Russia discovers Ukrainian laboratory with toxic substances

Among the dangerous substances they found sodium cyanide, sulfuric acid and traces of cyanide anions.

Russian military discovered and inspected a Ukrainian laboratory that was located in a town near the city of Avdéyevka, in the Donetsk People's Republic, and was used to produce toxic substances, the Russian Ministry of Defense announced this Tuesday.

The agency reported that at the site they found an evaporator, a filtration extraction system, chemical reactors, bottles with carbon dioxide, “personal respiratory protection equipment: gas masks, including some American-made; and from the skin: a Polish-made protective suit.”

Within the framework of an analysis, the presence of “sodium cyanide, sulfuric acid and traces of cyanide anions” was detected in the substances found. “The presence of these chemical substances clearly indicates that general toxic substances were produced in the laboratory found,” the statement reads.

From the ministry they indicated that the capacity of a laboratory of this type, staffed by 2 or 3 people, is "at least 3 kg per day", while the lethal dose by inhalation for this group of toxic substances is only 70 or 80 mg per person.

He reiterated that the use of a substance from this group, hydrogen cyanide, is prohibited by the Chemical Weapons Convention. “This compound is a colorless volatile liquid with a bitter almond odor. If it enters [the body] through the respiratory organs, this toxic chemical causes dizziness, rapid breathing, vomiting, convulsions, paralysis of the respiratory muscles and death,” he explained.

In this context, the Defense portfolio emphasized that, within the framework of the special military operation, cases of "use of homemade ammunition launched from unmanned aerial vehicles loaded with the substance in question" were repeatedly recorded.

sourceAgencies

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